Urban Farming Trends https://urbanfarmingtrends.com What's Happening In Urban Agriculture Today Fri, 11 Aug 2017 22:58:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.1 https://i0.wp.com/urbanfarmingtrends.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/2016-08-12_1722.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 Urban Farming Trends https://urbanfarmingtrends.com 32 32 127979001 Urban Farming for Everybody https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/urban-agriculture/urban-gardening/urban-farming-for-everybody/ Fri, 11 Aug 2017 22:58:29 +0000 https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/target/urban-farming-for-everybody/ Shantae Johnson, co-owner of MudBone Grown, stands at the Oregon Food Bank’s Unity Farm, where her startup — which also provides education, outreach and advocacy around food justice and urban farming — is now growing food. Photo by Christen McCurdy Shantae Johnson and Arthur Shavers both grew up in Portland and both grew up gardening. […]

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Urban Farming for Everybody

Shantae Johnson, co-owner of MudBone Grown, stands at the Oregon Food Bank’s Unity Farm, where her startup — which also provides education, outreach and advocacy around food justice and urban farming — is now growing food. Photo by Christen McCurdy Shantae Johnson and Arthur Shavers both grew up in Portland and both grew up gardening.

Johnson’s great-grandmother grew berries for the J.M. Smucker company, and her family grew much of its own food. Shavers helped his grandmother in the garden when he was young. After they met they kept a garden wherever they could – in community garden plots or in the back yard of a condo – but dreamed of having their own farm.

Now they’ve launched MudBone Grown, a company focused on promoting farming, education and community outreach – and a culturally specific urban food systems project at the Oregon Food Bank’s 33rd Avenue farm.

Prior to the company’s launch, Johnson worked for Multnomah County as a community health worker and breastfeeding peer counselor. Shavers had worked as a leather smith, firefighter and emergency medical technician.

Having inherited an interest in growing food, they wanted to pass that on to their children: they each had two from previous relationships when they met, and have since had two together.

“We wanted to teach our kids to be self-sufficient,” Johnson said.

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Growing Cucumbers Vertically https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/vertical-farming/growing-cucumbers-vertically/ Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:20:57 +0000 http://urbanfarmingtrends.com/?p=4970 The post Growing Cucumbers Vertically appeared first on Urban Farming Trends.

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I have just recently started growing cucumbers vertically.  For many years I grew my cucumbers by the old traditional method.  Make a hill and plant a few seeds and let them grow out from the hill.  This worked and I got plenty of cucumbers.  However, I discovered that the older I get, the less I like bending over or crawling around on the ground looking for my veggies. That is why I started growing cucumbers vertically.

Most of my crops are either planted in raised beds or in raised planters.  There is less bending, but also there are fewer weeds to deal with, it takes less water and overall just less work.

Raised Planter Boxes

Raised planters

Raised planters with lettuce, onions, and herbs.

The raised planters boxes are lined with pond liner and the bottom filled with about 4 inches of lava rock.  The rock is covered with a weed block to keep the soil from filling up around the rock.

There is a piece of PVC on top of the weed block that has holes drilled in bottom and runs out one end.  Soil is then used to fill the boxes.  You water about once a week in hot weather.  You know you have watered enough when it starts to run out of the PVC.  Although, here it is almost July in Texas and I have yet to need to water.  That will probably change soon.

 

 

Growing Cucumbers Vertically

Growing Cucumbers Vertically

Cucumbers

To grow cucumbers vertically, I made a support using cattle panels from Tractor Supply.  I just put in a few stakes down where I wanted the one side and placed the panel and bent it over and staked the other side.  I put a pile of compost down the middle to keep moisture in, keep weeds down and provide nutrients to the plants.  I have green beans on the one side and I am growing cucumbers vertically on the other.

I am growing pickling cucumbers that I bought online.  I thought I would have to train the cucumbers to grow up the trellis, but they seem to do it well on their own.  I still have several that grow near the bottom, but after you pick these most of the rest will be from the hanging vines.  It is the same with the green beans, you initially have to get down and hunt for beans, but after a couple of weeks, they grow where you can pick without bending much.

I was going to try cantaloupe this way, but what I thought was canteloupe turned out to be gordes, so I pulled them up so as not to attract squash bugs.

As the plants get larger and larger, the easier it is to find the cucumbers.  I am wasting less and less.  They are just hanging there waiting for you to pick.  I will definitely be growing cucumbers vertically from now on.

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Growing Mushrooms At Home https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/urban-agriculture/urban-gardening/growing-mushrooms-at-home/ Sat, 24 Jun 2017 17:28:18 +0000 https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/target/growing-mushrooms-in-coffee-grounds-diy/ Related Post The future of urban gardens This Company Delivers Honey Bees Straight to Your ... Urban Agriculture Shifts Tactics Under Trump Bringing butterflies on green roofs right to the h... America’s first urban ‘agrihood’ feeds 2,000 house... Upping the Ante on Urban Agriculture Research An All-Volunteer Squad Of Farmers Is Turning Flori... Urban Farming […]

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One of the easiest and most profitable crops you can grow is mushrooms.  Mushrooms can grow in many different mediums.  Many are very inexpensive and readily available.  I have seen them growing in chopped up cardboard, paper, straw and leaves.  They can also be grown on logs.

Many mushrooms can go for several dollars a pound.  Some, can bring upwards of $40 to $50 per pound.  Although I wouldn’t recommend starting with those.  Some commonly grown mushrooms are Oyster, Portabella and Shiitake.  Here is a list of some common mushrooms grown in the US.  Common Cultivars

Growing Mushrooms In Coffee Grounds

One of the easiest ways to get started is to grow in coffee grounds.  A sterile growing medium is necessary to get started and coffee grounds come out of the coffee maker already sterilized.  Step one complete already.  Now just inoculate and wait 2 to 3 weeks.

The following is an excerpt from an article a balconygardenweb.com on growing mushrooms in coffee grounds to get you started.

Growing mushrooms in coffee grounds is simple and easy and in this DIY you’ll learn how to grow your own mushrooms at home.

Mushrooms grow in all sorts of places associated with waste: fungi can grow on paper, on cardboard, sawdust everywhere. Their coincident growth is rather a different thing, but the fact is that growing mushrooms is difficult.You can’t grow them in ordinary garden soil. Organic materials on which mushrooms grow are called mushroom substrate and used coffee grounds work well for this purpose, because they are cohesive and already been sterilized during the brewing process[…]

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America’s first urban ‘agrihood’ feeds 2,000 households for free https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/urban-agriculture/urban-gardening/americas-first-urban-agrihood-feeds-2000-households-for-free/ Wed, 26 Apr 2017 18:00:51 +0000 http://urbanfarmingtrends.com/target/americas-first-urban-agrihood-feeds-2000-households-for-free/ When you think of Detroit , ‘ sustainable ‘ and ‘ agriculture ‘ may not be the first two words that you think of. But a new urban agrihood debuted by The Michigan Urban Farming Initiative (MUFI) might change your mind. The three-acre development boasts a two-acre garden , a fruit orchard with 200 trees, […]

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America’s first urban ‘agrihood’ feeds 2,000 households for free

When you think of Detroit , ‘ sustainable ‘ and ‘ agriculture ‘ may not be the first two words that you think of. But a new urban agrihood debuted by The Michigan Urban Farming Initiative (MUFI) might change your mind. The three-acre development boasts a two-acre garden , a fruit orchard with 200 trees, and a sensory garden for kids.

If you need a refresher on the definition of agrihood, MUFI describes it as an alternative neighborhood growth model. An agrihood centers around urban agriculture, and MUFI offers fresh, local produce to around 2,000 households for free.

In a statement, MUFI co-founder and president Tyson Gersh said, “Over the last four years, we’ve grown from an urban garden that provides fresh produce for our residents to a diverse, agricultural campus that has helped sustain the neighborhood, attracted new residents and area investment.” Through urban agriculture, MUFI aims to solve problems Detroit residents face such as nutritional illiteracy and food insecurity.

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An All-Volunteer Squad Of Farmers Is Turning Florida Lawns Into Food https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/urban-agriculture/urban-gardening/an-all-volunteer-squad-of-farmers-is-turning-florida-lawns-into-food/ Wed, 26 Apr 2017 17:58:05 +0000 http://urbanfarmingtrends.com/target/an-all-volunteer-squad-of-farmers-is-turning-florida-lawns-into-food/ In Florida, homeowners have a propensity for landscaping. They take great pride in the green carpet of grass in front of their homes. But one Florida man is working on a project that’s turning his neighbors’ lawns into working farms. Chris Castro has an obsession — turning the perfectly manicured lawns in his Orlando neighborhood […]

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An All-Volunteer Squad Of Farmers Is Turning Florida Lawns Into Food

In Florida, homeowners have a propensity for landscaping. They take great pride in the green carpet of grass in front of their homes. But one Florida man is working on a project that’s turning his neighbors’ lawns into working farms. Chris Castro has an obsession — turning the perfectly manicured lawns in his Orlando neighborhood into mini-farms. “The amount of interest in Orlando is incredibly surprising,” Castro says. Surprising because he’s asking Floridians to hand over a good chunk of their precious yards to volunteers who plant gardens full of produce. His program is called Fleet Farming , and […]

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Urban Agriculture Shifts Tactics Under Trump https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/urban-agriculture/urban-agriculture-shifts-tactics-under-trump/ Fri, 07 Apr 2017 19:11:35 +0000 http://urbanfarmingtrends.com/target/urban-agriculture-shifts-tactics-under-trump/ At a recent daylong summit on “The Future of Food Policy” hosted by Washington D.C.-based Food Tank, urban agriculture advocates expressed dismay over the current political climate, describing it as both chaotic and frightening. In the midst of this chaos, negotiations for the 2018 Farm Bill are already underway and supporters of urban agriculture are […]

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At a recent daylong summit on “The Future of Food Policy” hosted by Washington D.C.-based Food Tank, urban agriculture advocates expressed dismay over the current political climate, describing it as both chaotic and frightening. In the midst of this chaos, negotiations for the 2018 Farm Bill are already underway and supporters of urban agriculture are scrambling.

Urban Agriculture Shifts Tactics Under Trump

D.C. organizations who depend on urban agriculture to feed the food insecure will be impacted.

Advocates for urban agriculture are nervous these days. President Donald Trump has said little about his agriculture policy plans, his Agriculture Secretary nominee Sonny Perdue is a longtime ally to traditional rural agribusiness interests, and Trump’s proposed budget slashes funding for many of the agencies upon which urban residents depend.

At a recent daylong summit on “The Future of Food Policy” hosted by Washington D.C.-based Food Tank, urban agriculture advocates expressed dismay over the current political climate, describing it as both chaotic and frightening. In the midst of this chaos, negotiations for the 2018 Farm Bill are already underway and supporters of urban agriculture are scrambling.

Kathleen Merrigan is a former U.S. Department of Agriculture Deputy Secretary and longtime advocate for both organic and urban farming. Many observers say she’d be the Agriculture Secretary right now had Hillary Clinton won the election. Less than 100 days into Trump’s presidency, she sounds worried.

Executive Director of Sustainability at George Washington University, Merrigan, told the food policy summit audience she’d heard “the forces of darkness want to eliminate organic” from the Farm Bill entirely. Both organic and urban agriculture programs may be at risk for federal funding cuts, but Merrigan stands ready to defend the space urban agriculture has carved out for itself.

“Urban agriculture can’t feed the world—heck, it may not even be able to feed the block,” she quipped, but Merrigan insists the movement has more than earned its seat at the policy table. Urban farms matter, according to Merrigan, because they offer city dwellers a way to find a connection to the land and even their rural-dwelling, fellow Americans.

Historically, the Farm Bill has always brought together unlikely allies, so Merrigan is urging urban agriculture advocates to work with traditional rural agriculture groups. Considering the many cuts torural programs that Trump is proposing, Merrigan’s suggestion makes a lot of sense. She made that plea while sharing the stage with Kip Tom, a rural farmer from Indiana and a Trump supporter, signaling, perhaps, that negotiations can happen anywhere.

While Merrigan opined about federal funding, Chris Bradshaw, Executive Director of the D.C.-based non-profit Dreaming Out Loud, honed in on urban agriculture programs in the District. Bradshaw also sits on the D.C. Food Policy Council. For Bradshaw, D.C.’s city farms grow food, yes, but they’re also a conduit for social justice, or at least that’s what Bradshaw feels they should be.

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Upping the Ante on Urban Agriculture Research https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/urban-agriculture/upping-the-ante-on-urban-agriculture-research/ Fri, 07 Apr 2017 19:00:35 +0000 http://urbanfarmingtrends.com/target/upping-the-ante-on-urban-agriculture-research/ In addition to his work studying recycled nutrients in the soil of the community garden, professor Chip Small studies the same phenomenon in hydroponics, where the waste from fish is used to feed aquatic plants. (Photo by Mike Ekern ’02) It’s easy to assume everything is ready to continue smoothly in the growing field of […]

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Upping the Ante on Urban Agriculture Research

In addition to his work studying recycled nutrients in the soil of the community garden, professor Chip Small studies the same phenomenon in hydroponics, where the waste from fish is used to feed aquatic plants. (Photo by Mike Ekern ’02)

It’s easy to assume everything is ready to continue smoothly in the growing field of urban agriculture: Urban home and community gardens pop up more and more, and the evidence of sustainability and social benefits continues to grow. More of a good thing is a good thing, right?

Well, hold that thought. As is often the case with the complexities of modern life, there’s a bit more to the picture. Freshly armed with a $500,000 grant over five years from the National Science Foundation, St. Thomas biology faculty Chip Small and Adam Kay, and their students, are primed to contribute some much-needed science: They will be studying what effects recycled nutrients have in the soils of community gardens, which could greatly help shape the future of how urban ecosystems handle food.

“The main focal point of the grant is on the use of nutrients and how to recycle them efficiently. That’s such a general issue for an expanding population,” Kay said. “We know the stats of how 40-some percent of food is wasted in the agriculture system, so thinking about how the human civilization collectively can operate more efficiently, we’re going to need that moving forward.”

Small, who secured the funding as an early career grant, has been studying nutrient recycling in different ecosystems since his Ph.D. research and recently has shifted his lens to urban ecosystems.

“I’ve been asking questions about how efficiently we can recycle nutrients from food waste into new food through composting, coupled with urban agriculture,” Small said. “Something like nearly half the food imported into cities ends up as waste, and we compost maybe 5 percent of that waste. Theoretically that could be scaled up and provide lots of nutrients for urban agriculture.”

Of course, scaling anything up means increasing the amount of everything in play and, when it comes to growing food, that means increasing the amount of phosphorus.

“There’s sort of a nutrient mismatch between compost and what crops need. Compost, food waste, manure tend to have a lot of phosphorus relative to nitrogen,” Small said. “What we’re seeing is a lot of urban gardens that … are leeching out phosphorus. We have laws in Minnesota that you can’t just put phosphorus fertilizer on your yard because we’re concerned about water pollution and phosphorus going into lakes. But, you can put as much compost as you want in your garden and you might have the same effect. Nobody has really looked at that. That’s the research question.”

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Backyard Liberty for Preppers https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/survivalists/backyard-liberty-for-preppers/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 13:43:32 +0000 http://urbanfarmingtrends.com/?p=4821 GMOs – Big Gov’t’s Ultimate Weapon Against US Population   This is pure evil. The Government (in collaboration with Monsanto) has orchestrated a cunning maneuver to destroy the US food supply system. 3 emerging crises (artificially nurtured by the Government) have now guaranteed the most painful food system crash in modern history. So when food […]

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GMOs – Big Gov’t’s Ultimate Weapon Against US Population

 

This is pure evil.

The Government (in collaboration with Monsanto) has orchestrated a cunning maneuver to destroy the US food supply system.

3 emerging crises (artificially nurtured by the Government) have now guaranteed the most painful food system crash in modern history.

So when food turns to dust… and people will be hungry and helpless and scavenging for scraps… good ol‘ Monsanto will come to the rescue with overpriced GMO infected foods.

It’s the best way to control the population.

Fortunately, there is a way to shield yourself and your family from this mass-control manipulation.

>>Click here to find out more.<<

Brace yourself because what you’re about to see might make your blood run cold.

The liberals are already on pins and needles, praying word doesn’t get out about this leak.

Because this huge, hushed up conspiracy is about to turn your life upside down in the coming months.

Luckily … there’s still time before they can get to this video.

>>Click here to find out more.<<

 

 

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Aquaponics – How to Turn Fish Waste Into Delicious and Nutritious Food https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/hydroponics/aquaponics/ Thu, 16 Mar 2017 02:30:04 +0000 http://urbanfarmingtrends.com/?p=4370 The post Aquaponics – How to Turn Fish Waste Into Delicious and Nutritious Food appeared first on Urban Farming Trends.

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Aquaponics Definition

Aquaponics: a hydroponic system in which the waste water from aquatic life is utilized to feed the plants instead of premixed nutrient solutions.   This in turn filters the water for the aquatic life.  This creates a symbiotic relationship between the two.  Most hydroponic systems can be aquaponic systems just by adding fish.  They just have to be closed systems.  See the article on Hydroponics.  Watch the Aquaponics Video of this article.

Aquaponics arrived in the agriculture research world in the mid-1970’s.  Little has changed in the basic function and idea behind it since. They are still self-sustaining growing systems. What has changed, is the number of people around the world who are choosing to take part.

Aquaponics System

There are many different types of systems that can be setup.  It depends on growing needs, location, space. A little planning, some elbow grease, and a few fish is all you need for one of these sustainable systems.

Whether the system is a large scale facility or a small in-home set-up, the basic concept is similar. Use as little soil and water as possible. A system that will yield a renewable source of protein and fresh produce.  All with minimal waste of water or need for soil.

This process works by utilizing the beneficial waste of aquatic wildlife.  It is used to nourish the plants grown within the system. The plants work as a natural filter for the water, which is then returned to the fish tank.

The plants that are grown within the system need nitrogen to thrive. The fish’s waste water is a natural source of this element. This water feeds the plants. It gets pumped from the tank to the grow bed where it is used to feed the plants. The water then drains through the bed and returns to the fish tank in a filtered state.

For many individuals this type of auto-rejuvenating environment is essential.  It is for those who do not want to have to rely on a constant supply of commercial food sources. This is especially important if you choose to set up your homestead in an urban area. Could also be important in an area such as the colds of Alaska.

This can be a life saving practice in some areas. Areas where abundant water supply is lacking and growing conditions are harsh.  Those living in areas that don’t get constant rainfall or have limited space, benefit from this knowledge.

Aquaponics Fish

Aquaponics FishAlmost any species of fresh water fish can be used in an aquaponics system.  The species of fish which are used most are:

  1. 69% Tilapia
  2. 43% Ornamental Fish
  3. 25% Catfish
  4. 18% Other Aquatic Animals
  5. 16% Perch
  6. 15% Bluegill
  7. 10% Trout
  8. 7% Bass

I have used tilapia, koi, catfish, goldfish and bluegill with good success.  My next fish will be trout.  You have to be somewhat selective of your species though.  Select a species that can thrive in the water you are going to place them.  You can’t grow tropical fish in water that is going to get colder than about 60 degrees farenheit.  Some states prohibit growing some species indoor also.  You might want to check.

Aquaponics Plants

There is a wide range of plants that can be grown using this innovative method.  Commercial growers participating in studies on this subject planted a variety of produce such as:

  1. 81% Basil
  2. 76% Salad Greens
  3. 73% Assorted Herbs
  4. 68% Tomatoes
  5. 68% Lettuce
  6. 56% Kale
  7. 55% Chard
  8. 51% Bok Choi Cucumbers
  9. 48% Peppers
  10. 45% Cucumbers

Aquaponics Design

Research shows that the plant production of this type of sustainable system is successful. It is beneficial to those who are in need of an design that will provide both vegetation and protein. A good aquaponics design will provide you with a supply of fresh veggies and a good source of protein. You can count on these systems to provide a year round harvest.

vertical farming in aquaponicsProper pre-planning is essential to the success of your indoor growing system.  Not all systems will be optimal for all situations or locations. Before getting started, there are a few things should consider.  The amount of space available for growing, the type of produce you want, and location you are in, are just a few.
If you don’t have a lot of space you might consider growing vertically.  Vertical hydroponics systems are available commercially or you can create your own.  There are many design ideas on the internet.

You might want to start simple and develop more complex designs over time.  I started with one aquarium and a planter.  I then got another aquarium and more planters.  Then I went outdoors with a 275 gallon tote converted to aquaponics.  This utilized the cut off top of the tote for a plant bed with fish below.  Next was an inground pond and four half 55 gal drums for grow beds.  I now have greenhouse dedicated to aquaponics.  You don’t have to be complex to start.

Home Aquaponics

Home Aquaponics - AquaSprouts Garden

The AquaSprouts Garden Click To Learn More

Many people think that having a system in the house for growing produce has to be ugly.  Wrong.  As long as you have some imagination, you can have a system that not only adds nutrition, but beauty as well.

When considering  an aquaponics system for your home, you need to consider your location.  The amount of sunlight, average temperature, and growing season of your area are important.

People who live in the colder climates may choose to invest some time and money into a greenhouse.  Having a greenhouse can extend your growing season by quite a bit.  It allows you to plant earlier in the season.  Also, you can grow later in the season. I am in a climate that allows me to grow year round.  If you live in a warmer climate, a greenhouse might not make much sense at all.

The types of foods that can be planted is nearly unlimited. That is if there is adequate space and the right temperatures.   Although, It is best to plant produce that is commonly found in your region.

Not everything can be grown in an aquaponics system though.  Some of the crops, like corn, that take a lot of space may not work well.  Root vegetables, such as carrots and potatoes are grown using a wicking system. (see the hydroponics page)

With planning, you can enjoy a bountiful variety of fresh produce right in your own home.

Aquaponics DIY

The materials needed to create a home aquaponics systems include such basics as:

  • Tank for fish – This could be as simple as a 10 gallon aquarium.  I like a 55 gallon barrel or a 225-275 gallon tote.  Both are readily available are recycled from food industry sources.  Your tank must be food grade.
  • Growing bed and media for plants – You will need a container that is water resistant.  You can buy these ready to go, or you can build your own.  I build a box out of cedar and line it with pond liner.
  • PVC or other piping for water circulation – Do not use copper!  Copper will kill your fish.  I know from experience.
  • Underwater pump – It needs to big enough to completely recirculate the tank at least once per hour.  If you have a 100 gallon tank and you run it for 15 min/hour, then you would need a 400 gph pump.
  • Aerator System – The fish need to have plenty of oxygen in the water.  An airpump and a few airstones should do the trick.
  • Fish – A general rule is no more than 1 fish for every 10 gallons of water in the tank.  It would depend on the size of your fish though.  Some people say 1 inch of fish per gallon of water others say 1 pound of fish for every 10 gallons.  Just remember, they will grow, so figure on how much fish you will have when it comes time to start harvesting.
  • Plants – The general rule for this is one plant per fish.  Again, depends on the size of the fish and the plant.

Construction and design should be relatively simple and straight-forward.  A larger fish tank is best.  250 gallons at least if possible.  Larger tanks are more forgiving to changes in temperature and pH.  You should also invest in a water testing kit.  You need to know what the ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and pH levels are.

Aquaponics 4 You

When to Add Fish

The easiest way to get your tank ready for fish is to add a few gallons from an established tank or pond.  If you don’t have any friends with ponds or aquariums, or don’t know where a lake is, you can always add a small amount of ammonia (1 cup/250 gal).  In any case, start cycling the system (pump running, water draining cycle).  If you start with your tank filled with water right out of the facet, you will need to at least wait a week or two before adding fish.

I always start with just a few fish first.  Gold fish are available for just a few cents each.  Dump a dozen or so of them in and wait a few days.  They will help condition the water.  If they are thriving you can add more of whatever species you like.

When to Add Plants

Plants can be added at any time after you start cycling the system.  You probably won’t have exceptional growth at first however.  It will take a few weeks for the system to start working.  Some people add a small amount (1:1000) of liquid seaweed to the system.  It is not harmful to the fish and will feed the plants until the system is fully conditioned.

 

 

 

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Benefits of Aquaponic Gardening https://urbanfarmingtrends.com/aquaponics/benefits-aquaponic-gardening/ Wed, 15 Mar 2017 18:09:30 +0000 http://urbanfarmingtrends.com/?p=4799 The post Benefits of Aquaponic Gardening appeared first on Urban Farming Trends.

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Generally, aquaponic gardening relies on the connection between fish and plants: the fish produces bio-nutrients for the plants, while the plants clean up the water, producing the best environment for the fish to establish and grow. If you require some factors to get your own aquaponic system began, then here are some of the benefits you will get when you assemble it.

Natural Food

Most of all, you will have fresh natural food on your table each and every day, regardless of the hour when you choose to prepare your meals. You merely take your tomato, cucumber or your basil from the aquaponic garden and use it for your meals. It is as simple as it sounds.

Another feature of it is that you not only have grown veggies, you likewise have grown lots of fish. Whether you use them for cooking delicious meals or merely for your interior design, they are a fantastic addition to your house! They likewise have a useful function, as you will never ever need to utilize chemical fertilizers on your plants, therefore you will be getting genuine natural food.

Is Aquaponic Gardening Hard To Do?

If you ask, how hard is aquaponic gardening to put in practice, the response is “not very hard”. If you move from one home to another, then you just take apart the aquaponics system and take it with you!

Save Money With Aquaponics

Another terrific benefit of aquaponic gardening is that it provides you monetary self-reliance and control over your hard earned money. You understand precisely just how much you have to invest in your food and you will not have to depend upon the marketplace for your vegetables.

Stop Getting Dirty

Lastly, aquaponic gardening does not include soiled hands and clothing, no flexing and digging, no land and little upkeep time.   Your veggies and fish will seem to grow all on their own! It is a rather simple system to put in practice, appropriate for all kinds of individuals, even for someone that is busy or has little patience!
There are plenty benefits that the aquaponics system can provide you! Your health and your convenience will be enhanced, while your cost savings will significantly continue to increase with time!

Give Aquaponics A Try

If this sounds good to you, then why not give it a try?  Check out Easy DIY Aquaponics for a step by step guide on how to get started.

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